This is just one of a number of images, or "wordles" I spent creating today. Aren't they fantastic? Thank you so much to Jonathan Feinberg and the people at wordle.net for providing this excellent tool free of charge.

I don't consider myself a political person and a big part of me shies away from having too rigid opinions. First and foremost because I believe that everything changes constantly (changed circumstances means changed outcome), but also because I like flexibility and keeping my options open. Besides, I'm honest enough to admit that when it comes to politics I simply don't have the background knowledge to make any profound claims. Living in the United States at this particular point in time it's difficult to escape political talk though, and advertisements to register to vote, declare oneself and be counted are everywhere.

This got me to thinking in which ways we're communicating our values and beliefs every day in every aspect of our lives, not just in the political arena, by the decisions that we make. I stand for health and positive thinking by exercising, eating right, and writing down at least five things I'm grateful for every night before bed. This blog stands for empowering people to take responsibility of their own lives and finding the courage to change the behaviors that no longer serve and support them. My coaching approach is non-directive by asking questions that you yourselves find your own answers to, as I stand for thinking independently instead of following the herd like lemmings.

How are you communicating what you stand for? Which choices do you make every day that bring you closer to your goals, living out your values? Registering to vote and then going to the booth and casting your vote in November is only one way to announce to the world what you stand for. Living according to what is right every day ensures that you don't have to depend on politicians to behave the way you want them to, because you, too, are influencing your surroundings and creating this world with your example.

Addendum: Here's an article Seth Godin published on October 2nd about standing for something, and how making those difficult decisions can help your business.

PS: excerpt from the US Expatriate Handbook, Chapter 6:

VOTING IN US ELECTIONS

Americans who reside abroad are usually eligible to vote by absentee ballot in all federal elections and may also be eligible to vote in many state and local US elections. Eligibility depends upon the laws and regulations of your state of residence in the US. To vote absentee, you must meet state voter registration requirements and apply for the ballot as early as possible from the state of your last domicile. Should your state ballot not arrive in sufficient time, you may be eligible to use a federal write-in ballot. You should consult the nearest US embassy or consulate for additional information.

Image by Kodak Views, Flickr, Creative Commons License.

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