Allow me to brag again about my wonderful time in the city that never sleeps - it's SO fantastic!! One of my regrets was that we didn't stay for the "Sex and the City - The Movie" premiere, which must have been quite the event. That, plus the fact that there are nowhere near enough hours in the day to see it all, and tragically not enough money in the bank to eat and drink and buy all the tempting things on display in the various establishments. :-)

Anyhow, I did get to see the movie with seven fellow Carrie-lovers on the weekend it came out, and I wasn't disappointed. The city again featured prominently, and this time I was able to smile to myself thinking "I was there! I walked those streets!" Yes, some details felt a little rushed (Samantha and Smith's end of relationship), a little overbearing (there was never that much fashion in the TV show, was there?) or even a tad inexplicable (whatever happened to Markus?) but all in all I thought there were happy-ends all round. Charlotte got her kids, Carrie got Big, Miranda forgave Steve, and Samantha came back to New York.

If you've not seen the movie or don't know the TV show, none of this will have made much sense to you, my apologies. In general terms, the movie made me wonder where to draw the line when it comes to forgiving those who hurt us, and why? Just so we don't "end up" alone? The questions I'd like to put out there this week are these: suppose you find yourself left alone at the altar, in front of friends and family (maybe even the press, depending on how famous you are) - where do you go from there? Suppose your spouse admits to "an indiscretion", as it was termed in the movie, could you forgive them? How long would it take before you trust them again and take them back whole-heartedly? How realistic is it to go back to the person who so humiliated you (their word, not mine) instead of braving it alone, finding a new partner with a clean slate? Is the sole motivation really (like it was mentioned on The View) not to be single again? What about that old saying, better single than in bad company?

Yes, I realize I'm talking about fictional characters here, but come on - leaving at the altar and cheating actually happens in real life, too. I'm just curious as to how real people deal with these emotionally shattering events, forgiving and getting back together countless times, and what reactions they encounter from their friends and family after going back to the "villains" of the story. What would you do, as a friend, as the injured party or as the villain? Is it enough to be sorry? Or, to quote another movie (The Mexican): Between two people in love, when do you get to the point where enough is enough?

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