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ENTP and Graphology

Hello! Thanks for visiting and please enjoy the free info below! 

Just fyi, you can find me over at www.dorisfullgrabe.com from now on, where I'm making custom lettering and calligraphy. 

This archive will be discontinued next month. 

ENTP
ENTP

ENTPs are often described as enterprising, challenging, curious, objective, analytical, clever, and outspoken. Their lead functions are extraverted Intuiting Ne (aka brainstorming) and introverted Thinking Ti (aka analyzing) in the dominant and auxiliary position, respectively. Our ENTP writer in the meeting wrote in quick, sharp points. In this case it did not show an overly aggressive emotional foundation. The angularity indicated he enjoys debate, and that assertiveness and rapid responses would be a strong point for this person. Heavy pen pressure indicated emotional depth and mental acuity.

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Think Like A Traveler

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Think Like A Traveler

When you visit a new place for the first time, your perception processes are on high alert. You're more aware, more in-the-moment, more tuned-in. In terms of type processes we're looking at your Sensing or Intuiting function, where you're looking to experience your new surroundings (extraverted Sensing Se), review similarities to other places you've visited (introverted Sensing Si), infer deeper meanings and universal themes (introverted Intuiting Ni), as well as foresee potential opportunities and connections (extraverted Intuiting Ne).

What if you could keep that higher state of awareness switched on all the time?

Ok, not ALL the time, because we all know our brains have to filter out many things to help keep us sane. But when you want and need it? Say, when trying to come up with innovative solutions?

Because if you can do that, if you can have a higher state of awareness that people around you have, you will spot more opportunities and those opportunities will have value for you.

This is a quote from Tom Kelley, CEO over at IDEO - A Design and Innovation Consulting Firm. These are the guys who transformed patients' experiences in hospitals by actually lying on a gurney and realizing that staring at an artificial light-strobed ceiling is more conducive to worrying than relaxing. He gave an "entrepreneurial thought leader lecture" at Stanford, and this 4-minute video just really stood out. Love this guy, his energy, his passion, and his experience shine through.

You see, it all goes back to awareness. Observe your surroundings. Know what your perceiving function is, and then check back to the type processes linked above to learn how to practice switching them on.

Whether you're an expat, national, or international traveler - have some fun along the journey. Yes, the destination is going to rock, but the time you spend getting you there can give you great insights and valuable knowledge. After all,

You are the world's undisputed expert of your own experiences.

Use them.

Image by Patrick Ng, Flickr, Creative Commons License.

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Step 3 - Stop Judging, Start Loving (again)

Picture Credit Ananth Narayan My favorite Jung quote has to be

Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.

I know from my own experience that when you tick me off, it's probably because you're doing something a) I was always told not to do, or b) I want to do, but am too chicken. Either way, my knee-jerk reaction is going to be petty, begrudging, and resentful. I'm going to want to put you down so I don't have to feel so bad about myself. You're triggering something in me that still needs work to be integrated.

Type knowledge is really helping me understand the so-called Shadow functions, those that are unconscious, active below the surface, mostly bubbling up when I'm sick, tired, or stressed. You know those moments, when words are leaving your mouth as soon as you hear them you're aghast and wonder, "did I really just say that?" I've had plenty of those. They are great learning moments. Tough, but easy to remember, thanks to the strong emotions connected with them.

Let's take a moment to clarify that people with a "J" in their type code are not necessarily judgmental. Yes, J is short for Judging, but what that means in MBTI® theory is the function expressed in the extraverted attitude, what you're letting others see, is either Thinking (Te) or Feeling (Fe). When you have a P in your type code, it doesn't mean you're necessarily more perceptive, but that you're showing your perceiving function, Sensing (Se) or Intuiting (Ne), to the outside world.

How prejudiced are you, really?

Our cultural upbringing is going to play a big role in what is important to us; shaping our values. Someone violating those values will also trigger a judgmental response. Since our limbic brains are still conditioned to operate with a "Be Like Me" program, it's much easier to call someone "lazy" or "incompetent" if they do things differently. Believe me, when you're moving to another country or start working with an international team, that's going to happen a lot.

To appreciate the validity of the different approaches, we have to activate our neocortex and start considering the context that the other person is operating in. This is a conscious exercise, and our brains generally don't want to do a lot of work, so the judgmental or stereotypical response is easier to stick with. My opinion is that a stereotype in and of itself isn't bad, only insisting on it without examining the circumstances or accepting evidence of the contrary is.

Project ImplicitHere's a free online quiz you can take to see how much your unconscious is influencing your judgments:

https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/

You'll be asked to associate descriptions (good / bad) with e.g. race (black / white), self (you / others), size (big / small), and other items, depending on which assessments you choose to try out. It's truly insightful, so I hope you can take some time and perhaps even share your results with us.

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Monkeys in Your Brain

monkey found in brain new yorker april 5Today's New Yorker calendar cartoon reminded me of the extraverted Intuiting function for some reason. :-)

Ne, that glorious ability to jump from one thing to the next, connect the dots, opening up possibilities, recognizing patterns, and finding completely new applications and interpretations.

All types have Ne, but these four have it in their dominant and auxiliary (first and second) positions.

ENFP

ENTP

INFP

INTP

They are probably using Ne with some conscious energy, which means they're likely energized by it and can trust its results.

 

 

For ENFJs, Ne is in the 6th position. That's the Critical Parent archetype, and I've found that when someone comes up with well-intentioned ideas, especially about what I could be doing in my business, I hear that as criticism. Why haven't I done this already, and I should be doing that. It's hard to say a simple "Thanks I'll consider it", and forget about it move on.

While I just outed myself as not the best idea-taker, I've got plenty of my own to share. I guess the combination of Fe and Ni comes out as "here's what my vibe says you might want to consider". As a coach I try to keep my questions open-ended so the client may reach their own conclusions. I may have an Ni inkling, which I'll share only when invited, and then very carefully. As a trainer and mentor I can see lots of possibilities and new ways of doing things for my clients. NF: possibilities for people. Isn't that interesting?

How is Ne showing up for you?

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Extraverted Intuiting Ne

Ne doodle You use extraverted Intuiting or Ne when you're brainstorming. When you're projecting ideas into the future. When interpreting alternative meanings and seeing options. When finding commonalities among those options. "We have a pot of rice, what could we do with it? Oh, I know, we could add beans, corn, and cilantro and have a Mexican fiesta! Or, we have brokkoli and thai paste, if we get some coconut milk, we could have a thai curry. That reminds me, when we go to the store, we need to get toothpaste and a screwdriver. I want to get started on that arts project. We can do it together after dinner!"

ENTP ENFPFor people with Ne as their dominant function, they cannot not see -and want to explore- potential possibilities. Virtually anything you say will trigger a whole host of connections between seemingly unrelated items, and the opportunities they hold. Expats preparing for an assignment using Ne are likely to imagine all the possibilities they are going to have in the new country, and what they'll be able to do and accomplish.

If Ne is in different positions in your type dynamics, below is an overview pieced together with only a few items taken from Understanding Yourself and Others, An Introduction to the Personality Type Code, by Linda V. Berens and Dario Nardi. Let me say this again to be very clear: the description of how Ne can be expressed in the different positions is not exhaustive and only meant to give you an overview. I would love to have you comment below how it shows up for you.

Extraverted Intuiting Ne

If you'd like to practice your Ne skills, take some time to brainstorm up ideas without censoring yourself. Take five pieces of unrelated news headlines and try to find a connection. Play "Six degrees of Kevin Bacon".

Repeat the exercise to train your brain and establish new neuronal pathways.

Brain on NePS: Here's what your brain, or at least the upper area of the neocortex looks like on Ne: it's like a Christmas tree lighting up, all areas firing more or less simultaneously. Your brain can also show this pattern for non-Ne activities: when you're drunk. :-)

I got certified in Dario's Neuroscience of Personality program last year, and highly recommend it. If you'd like to do it, find dates near you here.

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Function Attitudes 101

8 functions flower doodleJung used the term "function" to explain ways we use our brain to gather information and make decisions. Sensing and Intuiting are his "irrational", perceiving, information-gathering functions; Thinking and Feeling are his "rational", judging, decision-making functions. Jung described our direction and source of mental energy ("libido") as an Extraversion or Introversion "attitude". Since all functions can occur in both attitudes, we end up with eight function-attitudes (a term probably first coined by Henry L. Thompson).

They are:

Extraverted Sensing Se; Introverted Sensing Si; Extraverted Intuiting Ne; Introverted Intuiting Ni; Extraverted Thinking Te; Introverted Thinking Ti; Extraverted Feeling Fe; and Introverted Feeling Fi.

Over the next 8 days, we'll go into a little more detail about each of these.

You have access to and use all eight function-attitudes, but they show up differently according to where they are in the hierarchy of your personality preferences.

I got four letters on this test, but I don't remember what they are...

If you have taken the MBTI(r) or another personality type indicator, you probably received a four-letter code. Your type code is short-hand for the type dynamics and patterns that lie within. For example, someone with ESFJ preferences has Fe as their lead, dominant, first function; someone with INTP preferences has Fe as their inferior, aspirational, fourth function; someone with ENTJ preferences has Fe as their demonic, eighth function.

Type describes the patterns that those mental preferences bring to who you are and how you behave. Don't break the code into its segments (e.g. to describe someone as a "Sensor" or a "Feeler"), because it's only the context of the whole type that accurately reflects your personality and mental processes.

I can do all functions equally well

Congratulations! Sadly, you're probably kidding yourself.

The function you develop first as your dominant is usually the one you are most comfortable with and most skilled at. It is also the one that is most under your conscious control. The further we go down the list, the less ability we generally have, right down to the eighth function that we probably use with least effectiveness. Until we become aware of the processes and work at improving them, of course.

Dr. John Beebe, noted Jungian analyst, developed a model where he charted the eight function-attitudes to archetypes. Archetypes are universal images that represent the human experience. He calls the first four function-attitudes ego-syntonic, or experienced as part of the self, and the last four ego-dystonic, or experienced as foreign to the self. In other words, those are behaviors and attributes we may project onto something or someone else without recognizing that they are part of us, inside us.

My favorite Jung quote:

Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.

 

Here's an overview of the terminology, and how the functions show up(1).

Function Attitudes Overview

Understanding what these functions mean for your particular type can have tremendous impact on your personal development, how you deal with stress, with change, your leadership and communication style, and it can certainly improve personal relationships as well. I have found them most helpful in my own analysis of how I dealt with expatriation challenges, and I've successfully used it with some clients as well.

What's the difference between conscious and unconscious functions?

You have the most conscious access to your first two functions. Your preferred functions are what comes most naturally to you. This is you in flow, at your best, on a perfect day, when things come easy. These two functions give you strengths and abilities that you probably take for granted and can't believe others don't have the same. These first two functions are the ones that you will have developed during childhood and adolescence, and - in an ideal environment that nurtured your gifts - got to practice the most.

The third function comes into play in or around mid-life, and the fourth function after that, if at all. This is why we have so many people in "mid-life crisis". It's their third and fourth function demanding attention - a completely normal and healthy process on the road to "individuation", becoming your whole self. Again - once you're aware of your type dynamics, you can start consciously working on developing all functions so you get comfortable using them eventually. With some you may never attain a level of grace, but at least you'll notice when they're working you.

functions conscious energy doodle

Because guess what: you're not in control of all the functions all the time, some take control of you. Particularly those that are more unconscious. Especially at times when you are sick, or tired, or stressed, or all of the above.

When those unconscious functions take over, and even when you try to consciously use them more effectively, it takes mental effort. When you're stressed, you may feel quite literally beside yourself. "Was that really me?" is a title of a book dealing with type and stress, that's how common that question is.

When you're unhappy with who you are and think you have to change for some reason, you will have to overcome your natural preferences and force yourself. It's not easy pretending to be someone else, and it's certainly tiresome.

Thankfully, type awareness helps. Or as Linda puts it:

"When you know who you are, you are freer to be who you're not."

(1) Understanding Yourself and Others - An Introduction to the Personality Type Code, Linda V. Berens, Dario Nardi

 

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So you think you're creative

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So you think you're creative

Photo by fmpgoh
Photo by fmpgoh

According to MBTI statistics(1), about 60 % of the US population have Sensing preferences. That means taking in information through the 5 senses, usually in concrete, detailed, present-focused ways. In type language, its opposite preference Intuiting has often been described with terms like future-focused, comfortable with ideas, themes, patterns. Creativity is often inferred from these descriptions, and here's why I think there's more to creativity than ideas. 

Creativity to me means bringing something forth that is new, an unexpected combination, something that may not be alive but that makes me feel alive, infuses my senses, makes me think, feel, be. A blog post, a poem, a picture, a sculpture that touches my soul.

Creativity is often called "right-brain", because the left hemisphere supposedly deals more in concretes. From Dario's research we've learned that neatly dividing the brain into four quadrants of Sensing, Intuiting, Thinking, and Feeling is simplistic and, I might add, disrespectful of the complexities that are human nature.

In Type language, every function comes in two ways or attitudes. Let's look at Intuiting. We all have both of these functions: Introverted Intuiting Ni and Extraverted Intuiting Ne. Different types use them in different ways, and we all have them.

What is Ni?

Think of a big library with millions of clips and notes that you've accumulated throughout your whole life. The librarian has given up on the index card system a long time ago, and yet magically, new information still gets filed where it belongs. Ni takes a lot of knowledge and stores it until you need it again. You won't know where it came from, but it's there, it feels right, and it often is right, too. You use Ni when you're foreseeing the future, when you just know, when you see how this or that is going to play out. When you grasp the meaning of something and can summarize its essence.

What is Ne?

To stay with the library image, Ne is the scribbler that takes your notes down and gets more and more excited the more he scribbles. New ideas, connections, relationships, themes, patterns keep bubbling up and it's hard to keep 'em down! They're so exciting! You use Ne when you're envisioning the future, when you're improving on an idea, and find new connections.

Knowing the significance and having thoughts and ideas about how to improve the future isn't creativity. It is probably the first part of the process, but it's not actual creation in the sense of the word. The differentiating factor is actually doing something with those ideas.

And that's where Sensing and other functions come in.

Albert Einstein (INTP):

"The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.”

In my opinion, creativity is a combination of all functions. There isn't one without the other. More on that tomorrow.

(1) MBTI(r) Type Tables International, CPP Inc 2009, Schaubhut, Nancy A. and Thompson, Richard C.

Image by glans galore, Flickr, Creative Commons License.

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