Part II of my interview with Jim Peak, co-author of Introduction to Type and Reintegration --

Jim Peak: Another thing that got me thinking more about Type and reintegration was Ken Burns' documentary "The War". They highlighted a couple of WWII soldiers from Alabama and Minnesota, which of course I had ties to. The last segment was about coming home, and throughout the documentary you had gotten to know these people, and the actual soldiers themselves talked about how tough it was coming back, "but so-and-so had a much harder time adjusting." You could see that these two people had completely different Types. Now I'm guessing, but I could imagine they were ISTJ and INFP, a more sensitive guy who liked to write and express things that way. Just that made me realize, hey, if I can pick that up, obviously it can relate to how a person can adjust and try to get back to normal.

That was an incentive for me to do some research into Type and military, and all I could find were case studies on PTSD. But what I was looking for were stories from people more like me: not really engaged in the horrors of combat, but still going through a huge, intense experience, that you still had to readjust no matter what. The chaplain and I would talk, and he said that the vast majority never really sees combat, but they're still affected. We really need something that can help the 90 to 95 % who don't fall into the PTSD category.

Doris: So you set out to create something that could also help other people working in war zones, like the NGOs, aid workers, missionaries...

JP: That's right. They also go through the same stuff trying to readjust to life in the US when they're coming back. One of the things I really like about using MBTI is that it's something stand-alone, not a unique military-endorsed program, but already very well-established, popular, and reliable. If people really understood it as such, my hope was they'd take the time to look at it again and be open and think this really could be useful.

D: How did you find participants for the book?

JP: For the research, I started asking questions, sending emails to members of my local Association of Psychological Type International (APTi) Chapter, and getting in touch with CPP and the Center for Application of Psychological Type (CAPT). Some of my contacts happened to have been in the military or military brats, so they were very familiar with the challenges and really encouraged me to go ahead and write it up. Sandra (Krebs) Hirsh eventually put me in contact with her daughters, Katherine and Elizabeth. We met a few times for coffee, and the more we talked, we started to prepare a proposal, look at some numbers, and decided to go for it. We split up the work, they wrote the bulk of the Type information, I've added to the intro and case studies, and we went back and forth for a bit. I had lots of colleagues and friends to bounce ideas off of, we still have people out in the field, some people coming back from Afghanistan in July... Writing is not as easy as I thought!

D: Welcome to the club! How long did it take from inception to completion?

JP: I think we got the final go-ahead in August, and the first draft was ready in January, and then published in May.

D: That's your second anniversary this year then, congratulations. Any one story that stands out in your mind?

JP: What we found is that ISTJ just "soldier on", so to speak. They come back home, file that experience away, and don't look at it again. Or I know one guy who's an ISTJ, and he just signed up for multiple tours, and kept going back and deployed over and over. He probably spent more time in Iraq and Afghanistan than any other guy I know. He just fit into the framework over there and was content.

D: That probably goes to the SJ temperament need for belonging and structure, it helps to know who you are and where you fit in. You belong to a group, there's a camaraderie and you trust them with your life. And these shared intense experiences create strong bonds.

JP: Indeed. Another contractor and I left Iraq on a C-130 aircraft, a military plane, and we flew out with a young soldier who had been killed that day. His body bag was in the back of the plane with us, and that was just such an emotional way to leave the country. Realizing that the young soldiers who were helping us out there, keeping us safe, were in danger and we had no idea who that person was. About five years later I realized that both the contractor and I ended up both doing some research independently to find out who that was. We found that he died due to an accidental discharge, it wasn't hostile fire, but he was dead just the same. He was from a town in Wisconsin about 100 miles from where I live. The contractor and I both also found a website that had been set up to honor him and other fallen soldiers, and we had both posted a message. (note: read Jim's message here.) That was a very moving experience. We had a couple of other close calls under attach in Iraq, but until then I never really thought about it. After that, I did.

D: You've been abroad three times, how were the reintegrations similar - or different?

JP: I spent about 5 years in Saudi Arabia, my family was with me, and when I came back, I moved into a new job with a new team and new responsibilities. I spent 8 years in Japan. Again, my family was with me, and when I came back, I moved into a new job with a new team and new responsibilities. Four months in Iraq left a much greater mark. I went alone, and I came back to my familiar job.

I tell people, that three or four months I was there was so much different than the eight years I spent in Japan for two reasons. One was the intensity of it. And then the second reason was, my family had been with me in Japan and Saudi, but from Iraq I came back alone, and I had no one else to share those common experiences with. I brought back a lot of stuff from Iraq, but it's like somebody else has been there, because I can't really talk about it in a way that others would understand.

The tour I did in Iraq was the first time I really felt plugged in and able to help people directly, not only in a roundabout way. It was very rewarding for me to see how the little bit that we were doing really made a difference.

D: In closing, what advice would you give someone coming back after a tour of duty?

JP: Recognize that going abroad changes everything. Once you make that first move - it's going to change everything. Coming back and readjusting is a process, and it takes time. Work through it. The more aware you are of yourself, the better. Type helps with that, and not just for you, you'll also be more aware of other people around you.

:-) Couldn't have said it better myself.

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